Putting Your Ancestors in Their Place

Putting Your Ancestors in Their Place

The following article was written by Guest Blogger, Diana Elder, from the wonderful blog, Family Locket. It was originally published on March 9, 2016. I asked Diana for permission to republish it here. This article provides some great advice for researching ancestral locations. Pinpointing the places where your ancestors lived can help enrich your understanding

Understanding the Past Through LDS Church History Tours

LDS Church History Tours

Heritage Tourism and LDS Church History Tours In addition to genealogy tourism, a similar travel niche is becoming increasingly popular. It is known as heritage tourism. LDS Church history tours  are part of this specialty tourism segment. According to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, heritage tourism involves “traveling to experience the places, artifacts and activities that

Traveling to Ancestral Homelands: Destination Belgium

Traveling to Ancestral Homelands Nothing compares to the experience of visiting ancestral homelands. Whether to a small town in Pennsylvania or a village in the British Isles, the trip will change you forever. Standing in the places in which your ancestors lived, breathing the same air, seeing the views they awoke to every day, connects

19th Century Welsh Migration to America

Second Wave of Welsh Immigrants In a recent article I discussed the large Welsh migration of the late 17th and early 18th centuries to the American Colonies. Many of these were Quakers or other non-conformists who fled Wales seeking religious freedom. Most of the thousands of Welsh immigrants settled in Pennyslvania and nearby colonies. Historians tell

Welsh Immigration

17th Century Welsh Migration to America

Welsh Migrations. Ever since I researched my Chilton-Watkins line from Wales, I have been fascinated by Welsh culture and history. This led me to do extensive research on major Welsh migration movements to America. This article will discuss the emigration of thousands of people from Wales to Pennsylvania between 1680 and 1720. Commonly called the “Welsh Tract,”